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Volume 3, Issue 2
IES LP-2-20: A new lighting practice
standard puts the pedestrian at the
center of the lighting design process
In the last Enlighten Journal, we shared information on The Illuminating Engineering Society’s (IES) new lighting practice standard, titled Quality Lighting Design for People in Outdoor Environments. LP-2-20 centers on design elements of outdoor space and the context and hierarchy of lighting the nighttime environment. Rather than dealing with criteria, LP-2 presents the issues of outdoor lighting for pedestrians with a focus on design applications.
IES-LP-2-20
LP-2-20 centers on design elements of outdoor space and the context and hierarchy of lighting the nighttime environment.
In this follow-up article on LP-2-20 and the IES presentation from committee members Nancy Clanton (Clanton & Associates) and Randy Burkett (Randy Burkett Lighting Design, Inc), we share Clanton’s method for determining site-specific light trespass levels by considering their relationship to land use zones.
“Not many municipalities have lighting ordinances, but they do have land use zones,” she says. Lighting Zones are rated from LZ0 to LZ3, depending on residential and commercial density or the Land Use Zone. First, find out what land use zone the site is in. Once you know the site’s land use zone, assign the lighting zone at the same level as land use. For example, an LZ0 lighting zone might be a nature preserve; a lighting zone of LZ0 would put very little light over its property lines. A lighting zone of LZ1 for a rural residential land use puts a little more trespass across properties.
IES-LP-2-20
Rather than dealing with criteria, LP-2 presents the issues of outdoor lighting for pedestrians with a focus on design applications.
Finally, says Clanton, think back to the BUG ratings of 0, 1, 2, and 3. “An LZ0 lighting zone should be assigned fixtures with BUG ratings of B0, G0, and U0; an LZ1 lighting zone would have maximum BUG ratings to match. The two align, and it really works quite well in determining maximum trespass levels.”
Clanton sees an opportunity for landscape architects and lighting designers to help educate land use planners who aren’t always knowledgeable about lighting zones. “I think there is a real opportunity for landscape architects and lighting professionals to help communities understand the relationship between land use and lighting zones and how to address environmental issues with light at night.”
IES-LP-2-20
The Quality Lighting Design for People in Outdoor Environments (LP-2-20) standard is available to IES members on the IES website.
Minimize environment issues of sky glow and light trespass by adhering to the lighting zone levels in designing outdoor lighting that is appropriate for the environment that is being lit.
  • Lighting zone 0: None to limited ambient electric light. Application for wetlands, wildlife preserves
  • Lighting zone 1: Low ambient electric light. Application in rural communities and residential areas
  • Lighting zone 2: Medium ambient electric light. Application in suburban areas. This is the default lighting zone.
  • Lighting zone 3: High ambient electric light. Application in entertainment districts and places of nighttime activity
  • Lighting zone 4: Very high ambient electric light. Not recommended in any application.
The Quality Lighting Design for People in Outdoor Environments (LP-2-20) standard is available to IES members on the IES website.